Data-based Individualization

Current education accountability initiatives require that all students make progress toward academic proficiency standards, including students with disabilities who often have challenging learning needs.  In honor of Learning Disabilities/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Disability Awareness Month, the directors from two Centers funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) and National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER) discussed how intensive intervention can help these students make progress. Dr. Lou Danielson and Dr.

Implementing intensive intervention to improve outcomes for students with significant learning and behavior needs is challenging work! In this webinar, panelists share lessons learned from five years of implementing intensive intervention at the district and school level. In this webinar, Dr. Rebecca Zumeta Edmonds, Deputy Director of NCII, Dr. Chris Lemons, Senior Advisor to NCII and Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education at Peabody College of Vanderbilt University, Dr. Kim Moore, NCII district coach for Columbia Public Schools in Columbia, Missouri, Dr.

Do you have questions about data-based individualization and implementing intensive intervention for students with severe and persistent academic and behavioral needs? In this webinar, expert panelists Drs. Chris Lemons, T. Chris Riley-Tillman, and Teri Marx address frequently asked questions surrounding implementation of intensive intervention. 

This document includes an overview of the data-based individualization (DBI) process. DBI is a research-based process for individualizing and intensifying interventions through the systematic use of assessment data, validated interventions, and research-based adaptation strategies. The handout provides a graphic representation of this process and an overview of the 5 steps of the DBI process. 

The purpose of this guide is to provide brief explanations of practices that can be implemented when working with students in need of intensive intervention in mathematics. Special education instructors, math interventionists, and others working with students who struggle with mathematics may find this guide helpful. Specific topics covered include the following: Explicit, Systematic Instruction Effective Questioning Concrete, Representational/Visual/Pictorial, Abstract/Symbolic Models

Intensive intervention teams can use these checklists to monitor implementation of the data-based individualization (DBI) process during initial planning and ongoing review (progress monitoring) meetings. These detailed checklists may be most beneficial for less experienced teams. As teams become more familiar with DBI implementation, they may choose to use the checklists less frequently or focus on only a subset of items.

This Module, the second in a series on intensive intervention, offers information on making data-based instructional decisions. Specifically, the resource discusses collecting and analyzing progress monitoring and diagnostic assessment data. Developed in collaboration with the National Center on Intensive Intervention at American Institutes for Research and the CEEDAR Center, this resource is designed for individuals who will be implementing intensive interventions (e.g., special education teachers, reading specialists, interventionists).

This Module, first in a series of two, overviews data-based individualization and provides information about adaptations for intensifying and individualizing instruction. Developed in collaboration with the National Center on Intensive Intervention at American Institutes for Research and the CEEDAR Center, this resource is designed for individuals who will be implementing intensive interventions (e.g., special education teachers, reading specialists, interventionists).

Ongoing sustained professional development that allows educators to continuously examine, reflect upon, and improve instructional practice, data-based decision making, and delivery of interventions is essential for implementing a multi-tiered system of support (MTSS). Where do we find resources to provide this professional development?

Question: Why might we need to consider integrated academic and behavioral interventions, especially for students with more intensive needs and those at the secondary level? 
 

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